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Torre Derecha or Torrenueva (The Straight Tower)

Diputación de Málaga

Torre Derecha or Torrenueva (The Straight Tower)

Ownership: Public
Period: 18th century
Construction system: Pebble masonry
Style of architecture: Simple
Architectural elements: Ravelin halfway up, vaults and stairs
Condition: Restored and in good state of repair
Access to the Coastal Path: Yes
Geolocation: 36º 44’ 53’’ N 4º 3’ 7’’ O
Surroundings: It is located in a public park that offers a convenient location for cultural activities.

 

Torre Derecha—or Torre Nueva—was built in the mid-18th century, under the reign of Ferdinand VI. This bastion is the work of the engineer Juan Zahoras.

It was built to replace the Torre Ladeada (Spanish for “Tilted Tower”) as part of a project to reinforce the coast guard. This was undertaken by the recently appointed Minister of War Sebastián de Eslava, who was formerly Viceroy of New Granada.

The construction was carried out in two different phases: the first body of the tower and a section of the entrance staircase were built before July 16, 1755, and the building was completed in August of the same year.

Its structure consists of three distinct sections:

Contrary to most of our coastal towers, Torre Derecha presents a hollow first body in a truncated cone shape. Its rooms served as a warehouse and ammunition depot. They were accessed through a trapdoor in the middle of the second body using a wooden ladder.

The second body of the tower is cylindrical and contains the main room for the guards. Facing north, the entrance consists of a blind segmental arch featuring 2 narrow embrasures through which the drawbridge chains passed. At that time, a small machicolation used to hang above the door to cover the unguarded corners of the entrance door. A limestone impost at the top of the building and covering its entire perimeter adds a decorative touch to the construction. On the eastern side can be found a large fireplace used by the workers for cooking and heating purposes during winter. The steep steps of the stairs leading to the terrace are located on the western side of the building. On the way up, there is a small window that lights up the narrow staircase.

The coast was watched from the terrace on the upper floor. Whenever a threat approached, smoke signals would be used to warn the population and other watchtowers.

Unlike most of the coastal watchtowers in Málaga, it was accessed walking up a non-wooden staircase leading up to the entrance. Just like its namesake in Cabo de Gata, this tower would accommodate 8 infantry, 4 cavalry and 2 artillery soldiers.

Monuments and Art > The Tower and The Fortified Building
Avda. Torre Derecha, Zip Code 29750