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Cuento y leyenda de Frigiliana

Diputación de Málaga

Cuento y leyenda de Frigiliana

Its name comes from the Latin “Frexinius” which corresponds to the name of a Roman personality.

  • Name of its inhabitants:

Frigilianenses.

  • Famous personalities:

Hernando el Darra, a Moorish leader and rebel who supposedly died in the bloody battle of Penon de Frigiliana in 1.569.

Liborio Apolinar Acosta de la Torre. He was born in 1.836 and was a Sawyer, a journalist, a writer and a biographer. Member of a College in Madrid, he was Master of his University and canon of the Cathedral. He died in Alcalá de Henares in 1.890.

Monte Pinto has a tradition that has become a legend. The story goes that when a sailor called Francisco Pinto, on his way from Verona to Cadiz at the end of the XV century, was sailing off Nerja, the sea became rough and tossed his boat about like a shell. Frightened of losing his possessions and his own life, the sailor implored divine intervention and promised that, if he came out alive from that infernal storm, he would build a cross on the summit of the mountain he could see in the distance. His prayers were answered and once on land safe and sound, at the end of his voyage, he returned to the summit he had seen in those terrible moments and fulfilled his promise and built a cross and a vaulted niche.

It is traditional to go up to the niche at the foot of the cross with a bucket of whitewash and the necessary tools and paint it, either to ask for a wish or in thanks after it is granted.

  • Legend:

A legend concerning the martyrdom of Saint Basilisa and Saint Epeneto has been proved true following the discovery of chronicles, based on an oral tradition, which relate that during the Roman domination and the persecution of Christians, Saint Basilisa and possibly also the bishop Saint Epeneto were martyred in the town.

There is a legend of a treasure, as in so many other places, linked to Moorish treasures and secret passages. It talks about the existence of a passage or tunnel, naturally undiscovered, which links Lizar Castle on the rock that dominates the town and the Turret of Dona Maria- a dead-end street opposite the Town Hall- or the surrounding area.

Chronicles and Legends (si se trata de historia)